Workshops

WORKSHOP DOWNLOADS

NAMEDESCRIPTIONFORMAT/SIZEACTION
SOLO Workshop Outline PresentationPDF (30.0 MB)Download
Ravish Momin CVCurrent (2018-19)PDF (66.0 KB)Download

VIDEO

Bio
Ravish Momin is an Indian-born drummer, electronic music producer and educator, who has developed an original blend of electro-acoustic beats, while drawing on cutting-edge music technology tools. His unique approach has led him to work as a sideman with a diverse cast of musicians ranging from pop-star Shakira to legendary avant-saxophonist Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre (AACM). Momin blends improvisation and rhythms from underground dance music traditions. He layers live-loops, triggers and manipulates rhythms and melodies ‘on the fly’, to further blur the lines between composition and improvisation.  
Option A (general audience) 60 minutes
I will conduct a clinic wherein I will explain my electro-acoustic set-up in detail as well as provide an overview of the music software.
I will involve the participants in clapping/tapping odd-metered phrases as well as learning some of the vocal syllables associated
with the rhythmic subdivisions and demonstrate their transference into the digital realms.  I will perform a few pieces as well during the duration of
the workshop.  I will deconstruct a basic digital composition towards the end of the workshop, and leave some time for questions from the audience.
Option B (general audience and musician involvement) 90-120 minutes
In addition to starting off with the elements of Option A, I will work with a few students (after having submitted charts and musical ideas ahead of time) to demonstrate possibilities
of how they can integrate acoustic and electronic elements.  Vocalists, brass-players, percussionists and electronic musicians will be asked to bring their instruments.
If students are interested in learning about the software specifically (Ableton), all will be required to bring their laptops and download a free/demo version for the purposes
of the workshop.
Option C 
In addition to including Option B, we’d add on a concert length (45-60 min)  evening performance that includes some of the students who’d participated in the workshop.
We would need an hour after the workshop to practice some of the material. The performance would be more of a ‘work-in-progress’ sharing than a full fledged recital,
on account of time-constraints.